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Best In Class How to... Safety Best Practice

Why You Should Have a Joint Health and Safety Committee at Your Construction Company

Construction companies who are successful in keeping their employees safe and keeping their insurance premiums low, accomplish that by creating safety policies and then putting them into action.

These companies go above and beyond local and federal regulations to ensure their workers make it home every day. These additional measures are referred to as industry best practices.

In the United States, one of the most common best practices is the creation and operation of a Joint Health and Safety Committee (JHSC). In Canada, it is mandated in most provinces for companies with 20 or more employees and/or projects that last more than three months.

What is a Joint Health and Safety Committee?

A JHSC is a group of employees with varying roles and responsibilities within the company, who meet on a regular basis to discuss internal health and safety matters.

The committee should be comprised of an equal number of worker representatives and management representatives, who work together with the same goal of making the workplace safer for everyone. A minimum of two designated people from each side is ideal.

The workers on the committee bring an in-depth knowledge of job-related tasks and hazards, while the management representatives have a strong understanding of the company as a whole.

Structuring the committee in this way also lends itself to better communication with the worker group as a whole. Employees are more likely to address safety concerns with their peer who is also the committee rep as there is no fear of repercussion.

Roles on the committee are usually filled via nomination and vote by the workforce as a whole. It’s a good idea for the company to provide successful candidates with some additional safety training.

What Are The Responsibilities of a JHSC?

A JHSC acts as a resource of health and safety matters and a form of communication between employer and employee. They advocate for the implementation of the company’s health and safety policy and program. A JHSC has four main responsibilities:

  1. Identify hazards and other unsafe situations through their job site inspections and collecting them from other employees.
  2. Conduct investigations when incidents occur, including a near miss.
  3. Make recommendations on appropriate control measures to the employer, and hold them accountable to follow through on their decisions.
  4. Keep records of all meetings, inspections, investigations, and recommendations.

What Are the Benefits of a JHSC?

An improvement on the health and safety record of the company as a whole is the number one goal of a JHSC but there are other benefits, including:

  • Creates a culture of safety within the company
  • Aids in worker retention (less likely to leave when they feel empowered and engaged)
  • Committee itself conducts tasks required by OSHA, keeping the company compliant in many ways
  • Can reduce language barriers when a committee member is bilingual
  • Builds connections between workers and management
  • Puts advocates of your safety policy and program on the front lines

How Technology Can Help Your JHSC Run Smoothly

Every member of your JHSC has other roles and responsibilities within the company. When provided with tools such as a safety management system, the committee will be able to better communicate and keep themselves organized.

An ideal situation would be to have a customized hazard notification form available electronically to your workforce which would be automatically sent to the committee upon submission.

Having one central database for the committee to conduct inspections, investigations and store the findings would make their job easier and faster.

Having access to all their findings also creates an opportunity for them to view analytics, so they may better determine trends and can focus their attention where it is most valuable.

Find out how Harness can help in all these ways and more by booking a customized demo.

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Safety Best Practice Training

The Mental Health and Suicide Epidemic in Construction: Why it’s Happening and How You Can Help

The suicide rate for those with a career in the construction industry is nearly 4 times higher than the national average. Read that again. If you work in the construction industry, you are four times more likely to die by suicide than someone who does not.

We all know construction is a hazardous job, yet construction workers are more likely to die by suicide than all the other job site hazards, combined. There are on average 3 construction-related fatalities per day, compared to 10-12 construction workers who die by suicide per day.

Yet, for some reason, mental health is not a standard part of the health and safety program of most construction companies.

Why is Mental Health and Suicide Such a Problem in Construction?

Men, in general, are at higher risk of suicide than women, and they dominate the industry. They also typically refrain from discussions surrounding their feelings with their peers, adding to the feelings of isolation. The industry also employs a lot of veterans, who are even more at risk than men in general.

However, there are many other industries dominated by men which do not have the same mental health statistics, so there has to be more to it than gender.

In the past, suicide has solely been linked to untreated (or mistreated) mental health issues. However, studies now show the workplace environment is a major contributing factor.

Employment is supposed to offer us a sense of purpose and provide us with social interaction and stability. On the other hand, negative or toxic work environments can lead to disconnection and despair.

Below is a list of factors that tend to lead to negative employee perceptions of their workplace:

  • Work that isn’t meaningful or rewarding (little exposure to the finished product or effect)
  • Work-family conflict (demands at work spill into family life, hours, pay levels, etc)
  • Low job control (lack of decision-making ability, lack of variety in job tasks)
  • Excessive pressure and expectations to work overtime
  • Prejudice and discrimination at work
  • Work-related sleep disruption (early and or late shifts)
  • Exposure to dangerous elements at work (jobs with a high risk of fatalities)
  • A culture of poor self-care and coping strategies (bottling feelings, drugs, alcohol)

Many of these factors are rampant within the construction industry, thereby leading to a higher rate of mental health issues and suicide. Regardless of the reasons why it is this way, it has to change. We need to take better care of our construction workers.

What Can Construction Employers do to Combat the Mental Health Epidemic?

There are two major ways that construction companies can proactively reduce the chances of mental health issues and suicide among their employees.

1. Fix Your Company Culture

Take a good hard, honest look at your company culture and ask yourself if the factors listed above are existent there. If they are, the first step is to eliminate them, or at least reduce them. These changes need to directly reflect the areas your company needs improvement with but here are some ideas to get your creativity flowing:

  • Email your staff with pictures of the final products they were a part of constructing, so they may feel a pride in their workmanship
  • If the days are too long, implement shifts or shorten the number of working days in a week (half get Monday’s off and half get Friday’s off)
  • Include your employees in decision-making opportunities, even if it’s not their field of expertise, ie, have a vote on the new company logo
  • Have conversations and provide coaching surrounding discrimination, work-life balance, healthy eating, coping strategies and more

2. Implement a Suicide Prevention Program

You should already have a formal health and safety program, now is the time to add a section on suicide prevention. Below is how to do that.

What is a Suicide Prevention Program?

The Construction Industry Alliance for Suicide Prevention uses the acronym STAND to advocate for construction companies to address suicide prevention as a health and safety priority by:

Creating SAFE cultures

The first step is to understand mental health issues, recognize your company’s part in it and commit to making improvements by adding them to your health and safety program. A culture of safety as a priority is best achieved from the top level of management down and must include actions, not just empty promises.

Providing TRAINING to identify and help those at risk

Just the same as you have dedicated First Aid / CPR trained employees on your sites, so should you have employees formally trained in suicide intervention. Additionally, conduct company-wide training on typical warning signs and how to refer a coworker who you are concerned about.

Raising AWARENESS about the suicide crisis in construction

This should be conducted internally through individual check-ins, toolbox talks, and team meetings as well as externally through newsletters and social media. Ensure the families of your employees also receive this information so they can educate themselves and watch for signs as well.

NORMALIZING conversations around suicide and mental health

Talk about the importance of mental health, hang posters, make it normal and acceptable to ask for help, and to take a ‘mental health break’. Encourage other contractors, distributors, and trade associations to do the same.

Ultimately DECREASING the risks associated with suicide in construction

Provide access to mental health care through employee benefit packages, offer self-screening tools, and provide access to crisis support hotlines via phone and text.

How Harness is Committed to Help

At Harness, we have recognized that, as leaders in the construction health and safety industry, we have a responsibility to raise awareness of this issue. In response to that, we have committed to providing all contractors with FREE access to construction-specific toolbox talks focused on mental health and suicide prevention.

We have included these toolbox talks as a downloadable resource at the end of this article and have also added them to the selection of digital toolbox talks included in the free version of our safety app. Learn more about our FREE Plan or download the paper resources by clicking the button below.

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News Reaction Safety Best Practice

COVID-19: The Top-Cited OSHA Standards, and How to Mitigate Them

The Covid-19 crisis has plunged many businesses into one of their most challenging times. Employers are struggling to keep pace with the new rules and regulations to keep workers, suppliers and the public safe during the pandemic but also to lessen the impact on generating business, maintaining client outreach and managing the financial impact covid-19 has made.

How are you keeping you, your employees, and the public safe while continuing to work during the COVID-19 crisis? This is a common question not only among business owners and managers but also essential workers everywhere.

Employee morale is low, and cases seem to be ever on the rise. To help combat these effects on businesses and workers, OSHA has shared the top-cited infractions during the pandemic.

OSHA’s Frequently Cited Standards Related to COVID-19 Inspections

OSHA’s has released the most common citations that are being issued during the pandemic; these are:

  • Failure to providing a medical assessment before a worker makes use of a respirator or is fit-tested
  • Lack of training employees to safely make use of respirators and other PPEs in the workplace
  • Neglecting to retrain employers regarding changes in the workplace that could make initial training obsolete
  • A disregard for keeping records of illnesses, injuries and fatalities related to work
  • Failure in storing respirators and other PPEs in a proper manner that will safeguard them from contamination, damage and face-piece deformation and exhalation valve where necessary
  • Coming up short with establishing, updating and implementing a written respiratory protection program that has the essential worksite-specific procedures

When OSHA shows up on your site, they are actively looking for accurate and up-to-date record-keeping concerning Covid-19 protocols in the workplace. Below are a few examples of additional measures that should be currently taking place to help mitigate the possibility of a citation on your business and your employees.

Additional Covid-19 Measures You Should be Doing

The CDC measures used to combat the spread of COVID-19 across the world are flattening the curve and slowing the spread of new cases.
The effects of COVID-19 vary from state to state. Because of that, local governments, working with local public health authorities, may change or update safety measures depending on where you live.

However, we’re seeing a positive change concerning outbreaks when these additional measures have been adopted into the work day.

1. Daily Screening Process

Screenings should be taking place before employees or the public enter the business/job site. The required questions tend to vary from state to state but all center around identifying possible symptoms and exposures. It is important to keep in mind that the form itself can be as simple as a “Yes” or “No” questionnaire, thus reducing the amount of time required to fill it out.

Here are some questions commonly found on a Daily Screening Form, currently being used in the construction industry:

  • Have you knowingly been in close or proximity contact in the past 14 days with anyone who has tested positive for COVID-19 or who has had symptoms of COVID-19?
  • Have you tested positive for COVID-19 in the past 14 days?
  • Do you have any of these symptoms that are not caused by another condition: Fever or chills, cough, etc….

The goal of daily screening is to catch any positive cases before they progress to an outbreak but also to identify who the worker has been in contact with. Having these records is a valuable tool when narrowing down when/where the exposure took place.

2. Exposure Process

What happens if someone has been exposed or has symptoms? We all know identifying an issue is the first step in finding a resolution to a problem. We have taken that step with our Daily Screening Process, but now what?

Typically, the response looks as follows:

  • The employee is sent home to isolate for “10 days since symptoms first appeared and at least 24 hours with no fever without fever-reducing medication and other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving”
  • Employee required to take a COVID-19 test
  • The Project manager and HR are notified immediately so
    Contact tracing by utilizing the Daily Screening Tool is completed

3. Sanitization

What new cleaning/sanitization procedures have you initiated since covid-19? How do you ensure that these new procedures are being followed?

Jobsite Hazard Assessments are a staple in the construction industry, updating your current JHA to accommodate identification and controls of all Covid-19 related hazards is a must.

The JHA should include (but not limited to) shared tools and vehicle sanitization both at the start and end of the day. This coupled with daily screening ensures that employees are starting and finishing their day in a clean environment while minimizing the risk of exposure to Covid-19

4. Education

“Knowledge is Power” – Francis Bacon

Arming your crews with up to date Covid-19 prevention and sanitization methods is paramount. What is the best way to get this information out? Toolbox Talks are an informal group safety meeting that dial in on a particular safety issue. Utilizing your current Toolbox Talk program is a great way to distribute Covid-19 related information out to your teams in the field.

Tools to Help Navigate the Pandemic

Everyone is tired and weary of continuing to work during the pandemic, I hope this article shed some light on some of the steps that should be taken to help pull through this together.

Safety Apps are great tools to help get vital training out to the crews in the field. Harness contains Toolbox Talks concerning everything from Covid-19 to Heat Stress available in both English and Spanish and can deliver and track these meetings with a touch of a button.

Harness has also made available a free version of the app oriented strictly around Covid-19 to help keep workers safe. Click the button below to download it now. learn more about the Free Covid-19 Safety App.

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Safety Best Practice

5 Easy Tasks to Start Your Construction Safety Program

We are thrilled to hear that you’ve decided to make safety a focus at your company! Okay, we didn’t actually hear that, but the fact that you are here, taking the time to learn more about getting your safety program off the ground makes us pretty confident in the assumption that you are committed to change. This means you are officially on your way to safer job sites for your workers and being more compliant with government policies (i.e. OSHA).

It is completely understandable for you to feel confused and overwhelmed at this point, the safety industry (and the internet) tend to do that to people. No need to worry any longer, we are about to clear things up for you.

Here Are 5 Easy Safety Tasks All Contractors Should Be Doing:

1. Conduct and Document Weekly Toolbox Talks

A Toolbox talk, sometimes referred to as a safety meeting, is the base of any good safety program. It is a two-part process consisting of a safety lesson followed by the documentation of what was discussed, with whom, when and where.

If you can only find time for one safety task a week, make it a toolbox talk. Conduct them with every field worker, on different and relevant safety topics.

We realize it’s next to impossible to get every worker in one place at one time, ever, let alone once a week, and that’s not a problem. This talk should actually be delivered in smaller groups, ideally right on the job site where the material, equipment and tools you are discussing are readily available.

You can deliver these talks yourself if you are able to make it to each site on a weekly basis, otherwise, it is okay to assign this task to the supervisor or foreman of each crew. In fact, the more a crew is assigned safety responsibilities, the more likely they are to take ownership of them and put them into everyday practice.

2. Show Up Unexpectedly Onsite

This one is about as basic as it gets. If you want to really know what is going on at your job sites, you have to SHOW UP.

If your crews know you are coming, that’s okay, but it’s even better if they don’t. The more they realize it’s possible the boss shows up at any time, the more likely they are to consistently comply with the rules.

We’ve seen some supervisors park down the street and watch their crew with binoculars before they arrive at the site. Another sneaky but useful tactic is to ‘forget’ something at the site and circle back 10 min later to get it. Then you’ll know if any compliance measures are dropped as soon as you turn your back.

You can send any of your supervisors to the site to do random checks, but the higher you are up the chain of command, the higher levels of compliance you will start to notice. These visits don’t have to be negative or unwarranted either. Dropping off coffee or running them more material are perfectly good covers for your arrival and will be appreciated by the crew as well.

3. Recognize Safety Adherence and Infractions

EVERY TIME you see a safety infraction, you need to act on it. The moment you let something slide, your employees will notice and likely won’t comply next time. This may mean you are very busy to begin with, but if you are consistent, it will improve.

If you haven’t been great at staying on top of infractions, you should give your employees fair warning that you are about to start. In your explanation, provide reasons for the change, with your concern for their personal safety topping the list.

They should also know what the consequences are if they are caught making unsafe choices. Many companies have a written policy that escalates based on the number and severity of the infraction.

Usually, the first offence warrants a verbal warning, whereas a second or third incident should definitely be documented in writing. A third or fourth offence may warrant a suspension. On the other hand, if the first offence is something that puts their life or the lives of their co-workers at risk, you may decide to skip to the second or third warning tier.

Just as important as acting on the negative is remembering to reward the good behaviour. Rewards can be as simple as a high five; just knowing that the boss has noticed them is often enough.

However, gestures such as bringing them a cup of coffee on your next site visit or praising them among their peers are also effective. Some companies even run monthly leaderboards to add a dash of healthy competition.

4. Teach and Train Employees

Ideally, you should be running formal training sessions with a professional who is qualified to certify your crews in specific safety tasks. However, you can get started today by spending time on site to teach proper, safe techniques when using equipment, material, and machines.

This is especially important when it comes to infractions. Every infraction that is handed out should be tied to some sort of training or resolution. You can give the individual the training or use it as a teachable moment for the entire crew.

There is no harm in hosting a toolbox talk on the topic, even if you’ve already done one that week. The more serious the offence, the more formal the training should be, and that may mean the employee needs to sign up for a course off-site prior to their return to work.

It is also entirely possible the issue can be corrected by the company, such as providing extra Personal Protective Equipment in each truck for when something is forgotten or breaks.

You probably already pay special attention to new workers as they obviously require help to learn the ropes and that’s fantastic; but don’t forget about your seasoned employees either. Where your new employees will likely display a healthy level of caution, seasoned employees can be overconfident, leading to skipped steps and high levels of risk. Reminders to slow down and to be a good example for the sake of the new workers can be very effective without damaging their pride.

5. Build a Safety Culture

A safety culture will develop naturally to some degree as you incorporate the first four tasks; however, the companies with the most success will treat safety seriously from the top down. The owners and management team need to make a commitment to safety and then walk the talk in their daily work life.

If your workers know how seriously you take safety, over time they will do the same. But the first time you prioritize production over safety, you will undo everything you had accomplished. They will get the message that safety is just a show, and what really matters in the end is money.

We can understand the pull that you may feel to focus on results ahead of safety. It’s natural. You want your business to succeed, and that means completing work and getting paid. When it comes to your focus on safety though, you have to play the long game.

The success of the first four tasks hinges on the strength of your commitment to safety day in and day out.

Next Steps

Other than starting each week with a short toolbox talk meeting, every other task we just covered can be worked into your existing daily routine with very little additional time required. As long as the company has provided your workers with the equipment they need to stay safe, there really aren’t any additional costs either. So there are no excuses as to why you shouldn’t start your program today.

We already know that your priorities are:

  • To keep your workers safe and
  • To reduce your company’s liability should an incident occur

And now you have the tools to act on them.

Next you should, check out our article What is a Toolbox Talk (A 2-Part Safety Meeting) to become an expert at them or jump right in and download our Toolbox Talk Form below.

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Leadership & Culture Safety Best Practice

Top 5 Ways To Foster A Safety Culture In Your Construction Business

If you’re a construction company owner or manager, you understand just how critical it is to create a formal health & safety program for your company.  Perhaps you are already doing some of the basics, such as providing safety training or conducting periodic safety meetings.  

At Harness Software, I’ve been fortunate to work with contractors across North America who have decided to create or build a true culture of safety.  

After hundreds of meetings, dozens of conferences, and over half a million miles flown,  I’ve noticed that the firms that excel in safety all have one thing in common:  A strong commitment from ownership and management towards the safety & wellbeing of every worker.  These companies have happy, productive workers, and they have lower than average worker’s compensation premiums, which gives them a competitive advantage in their industry.

Now, many companies say they have this commitment.  You can visit the website of any contractor and usually see mention of it.  But they often lack the will to actually see it through.

Jobs that are behind schedule suddenly stop having safety briefings or inspections.  Workers are told, “Just get it done.”  They pick up on the urgency of their management and start cutting corners when it comes to safety –all for the sake of profitability or fear of losing their jobs.  That is not a safety culture.  

Whether you’re the leader of a single crew or an entire company, the first time you prioritize production or results over safety, you will have sent the message loud and clear to your workers that your commitment to safety is just an empty statement on your website.  As a business owner myself, I can understand the pull that owners may feel to focus on results ahead of safety.  It’s natural.  We want our business to succeed, and that means completing work and getting paid.  When it comes to our focus on safety though, we have to play the long game.

How will you motivate your workers to go above and beyond on the next project if they don’t truly believe you have their best interests at heart? 

Top 5 Ways To Foster Your Safety Culture:

 

1. Sign A Commitment to Safety Letter

Write a personal letter that outlines your own commitment to safety and ensure every worker receives a copy when they are hired.  Have each worker acknowledge the letter and add their own written commitment to safety as part of the hiring process.  They could do this via a simple checklist.  Doing this is a great way to hold both management & employees accountable.

 

2. Establish a Joint Health & Safety Committee

Establish a joint health & safety committee of workers from across the organization.  The goal of this committee will be to inform safety policies and identify ways to improve safety over time.  Empower committee members by treating them as equals and not just employees.  Actually implement their ideas so that the rest of your organization and the committee members themselves view the committee as the safety authority for your company.  The best safety programs are ones where workers feel ownership.

 

3. Set A Budget

 

Create a dedicated budget for safety within your organization that can be used for training, equipment, productivity tools, etc. Make sure the amount is appropriate for your company size and review the budget annually.  According to the National Safety Council, every $1 spent on safety returns between $2-$6.  That’s a great investment 

 

4. Talk Safety First.  Results Second.

 

Review safety measures being taken on job sites prior to EVERY production-related discussion. Showing your own personal commitment to your worker’s health & safety in some way every day is a quick & easy way to remind them that you care.  Make it clear that your example should be followed by the entire management team.  It will quickly become a habit and often leads to illuminating discussions that can benefit the company in other areas than just safety.

 

5. Get Advice From The Best

 

Seek out advice within your industry via professional associations or think-tank groups and bring those findings to your safety committee.  National and regional trade groups like the National Roofing Contractors Association, Midwest Roofing Contractors Association, Association of General Contractors, and Mechanical Contractors Association of America are all great examples.  They each have developed safety resources and working groups to promote safety best practices amongst their membership.

 

Bonus Tip:  Celebrate Safety Success.  

 
Provide updates to your organization on your safety record (lower recordable injuries, etc..) to workers on a regular basis, and take the time to point out particular efforts of individual workers.  You could do this by posting on a board in your office, or sending a dedicated email.  You could even use weekly safety meetings to acknowledge the efforts of an individual worker or a group.  

Safety incentive programs that reward employees for certain behaviors can be a good idea as long as they don’t discourage or punish workers for reporting unsafe conditions.  For example, incentivizing workers who complete their safety planning activities thoroughly is better than incentivizing workers for a lack of recordable injuries on a project.  The latter could result in workers hiding injuries or unsafe conditions and that could land your company in trouble with OSHA.  

Celebrating the right behaviors and commitment to safe work is another great way to prove to your workers that your commitment to a culture of safety isn’t just an empty promise.  It’s something that you live every day.

Next Actions

Hopefully, by now you have a better idea of how to foster your company’s safety culture.  

Harness Software is a construction safety app used by thousands of contractors every day to remove the administrative burden from their health & safety program, allowing them to measure success and, ultimately, save money.

If you’d like to see how Harness Software could make it easier for your company to strengthen its safety culture, book a 30-minute consultation & demo.

Otherwise, there are some more fantastic & free resources available on our blog that you can use to create a strong construction health & safety program. Such as:

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Safety Best Practice Safety News

Harness Launches Free COVID-19 App

Harness Software announces the availability of a FREE Safety Meeting/Toolbox Talk App that will enable construction companies to disseminate COVID-19 virus-related information to their remote workforces and help them document employee meetings. This app is immediately available to all construction companies in North America

  • The app includes access to the latest content from reputable sources such as the Centers For Disease Control (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • All information within the app will be organized into short talks with emphasis on points relevant to construction workers.
  • The app will be updated automatically as more information becomes available
  • All material will be available in English & Spanish
  • Foremen or Supervisors will be able to quickly capture names and signatures from the attendees of each safety meeting/toolbox talk
  • PDF records of each meeting can be automatically emailed back to the office
  • THE APP WORKS ON ALL MOBILE DEVICES

“Construction workers don’t have the option to work from home. Companies need easy access to the information necessary to protect their employees and keep them as productive as possible during this crisis. We are all in this together. That’s why we’re launching this free resource.”, said Tom Whitaker, CEO of Harness Software. Existing Harness Software customers will also receive enhanced resources as part of this program to battle fear & the spread of the disease.

Download the app by clicking the button below.

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Leadership & Culture Safety Best Practice

4 Reasons You Should Invest in Construction Safety Technology

 

Making the case for software or other technology investments can be a tough subject – especially if your work can continue without spending that money. It’s one of the big reasons why the construction industry lags behind others in adopting new technologies.

Some who have sought to improve efficiency through technology have faced an uphill battle with upper management & ownership. This helpful guide will provide you with advice to make those conversations go more smoothly and ultimately in the company’s favor.

To land the technology you know your company will benefit from, you’ll need a solid case that outlines why the investment is necessary. If the goal is solely to create safer jobsites, that may not be enough to convince the C-suite to move forward.

4 Ways an Investment in Safety Technology Benefits your Business:

Good news: Investments in technology to improve safety can actually impact departments that span far beyond safety itself. Pointing out potential company-wide improvements can help justify the cost of technology for safety to leadership.

1. Increased Sales

The negative publicity alone from a workplace injury can be enough to negatively impact work.

Certain general contractors, industrial sites, healthcare organizations, and educational institutions simply won’t work with companies that have poor safety numbers – such as your total recordable incident rate, your experience modification rate, OSHA citations, or lost-time incidents – due to the inherent risks involved. They want to hire and work with safe contractors so they don’t have to worry about delays, downtime, injuries, or potential lawsuits.

If you can demonstrate how your technology investment will make it easier for employees to get on board with safety culture, policies, and procedures, then you can also explain that the investment may also pay off in more work due to better safety numbers. Safety is a sales differentiator!

2. Streamlined Finance and Accounting

There are many ways that an investment in technology for safety can make life easier for your accounting team.

To demonstrate the impact your investment may have for this group, provide a few real-world examples of common jobsite injuries and their associated costs. There are plenty of illustrations to choose from (we can provide data that may help, too).

Don’t forget to quantify all related expenses, from production losses and wages for work not performed to damaged equipment and increased insurance costs. Then compare those numbers to the cost of your technology investment. Everyone will quickly be able to see that the cost of technology to improve safety is much lower than the cost of an injury – which is often the result of an unsafe work environment.

Be sure to share information with the accounting team about other potential financial savings that can result from a technology investment as well, including the avoidance of OSHA penalties and a reduction in general liability insurance, workers’ compensation insurance, and medical costs.

The right technology can also eliminate the paperwork shuffle for the accounting department, allowing employees in the field to send things like timesheets, packing slips, receipts, and status reports electronically so no one has to track and file hard copies or make sure they get back to the office.

3. Smooth Operations

Being safe on the job site isn’t a productivity bottleneck. In fact, it can have quite the opposite effect. Investing in technology that helps your organization take a holistic approach to safety actually leads to higher worker productivity. Why? Because time and money aren’t lost due to injury or work restrictions.

Workers who are afraid of getting hurt may produce less as they attempt to avoid potential hazards. Employees are more productive when they work on jobsites they trust to be safe – they don’t have to worry about avoiding certain tasks or areas.

An investment in technology for safety can help field staff be more confident about installation practices and the tools and equipment they use. Technology that puts this information in the palms of their hands means they don’t have to waste time searching for answers to questions, discussing with others, or waiting for callbacks from a safety director. This keeps projects moving forward as planned.

The right technology can also speed up the approval process for things like energized work reports or change orders. When an employee in the field can complete forms electronically, document their plan, and submit everything electronically for authorization, work continues without delays or holdups on the approval process.

4. Reduced Employee Turnover

Recruiting and retaining top talent are easier for organizations that care for employee well-being and provide safe workplaces. A strong focus on and investment in safety demonstrates to employees their importance and value, which can reduce employee turnover and absenteeism.

When employees know that their own protection comes first, they’ll feel more loyal and be less likely to look elsewhere for work. After all, who wouldn’t want to work for a company that makes investments to improve safety and protect employees?

The Return on Investment

We’ve mentioned now a few times that safety management systems like Harness lower incident rates, and lower incident rates lead to reductions of your workers compensation and insurance premiums. If you are going to use this as part of your pitch to implement technology with your management team, you’d better be prepared to explain how.

Luckily, we wrote an entire article on understanding how this works through your company’s Experience Modification Rating. Click the button below to gain a better understanding of EMR.

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Leadership & Culture Most Popular Safety Best Practice

How KPost Solved Its Labor Problem With Technology

 

KPOST Roofing & Waterproofing is one of the most successful roofing contractors in the U.S.   They’re also one of the most forward-looking.  They were an early adopter of Harness because they wanted to better manage their safety program so they could improve the lives of their workers while also saving time & money.  They’ve continued to search for tech-based solutions to other urgent business problems.

The Labor Issue.

Even KPOST isn’t immune to the problem of finding enough skilled workers. So, when they were awarded the contract to build the 8000 square-foot roof for Facebook’s new data center in Fort Worth, Texas they were excited and concerned at the same time. If the project didn’t keep to the bid schedule, how would they allocate the workers the job required without a negative effect on their other projects?

Technology to the rescue.

Steve Little, a KPOST founder who calls himself “Head Coach” and his staff began discussions with manufacturers of modified bitumen for tools that could reduce the labor required on the rooftop. They found a tool that was primarily being used in Europe and Canada that can apply roofing membrane in a way similar to how a paver applies asphalt to a road. The machine is called a Mini-Macaden® and it’s manufactured by SOPREMA®.

The type of system being applied at Facebook’s data center would ordinarily take a crew of ten people. The Mini-Macaden that KPOST would employ reduced that number to six people. That’s a 40% labor savings!!!

Additionally, this new technology reduced the amount of material waste, propane used and increased safety on the site because there were fewer open flames.

With fewer workers on the job, it wouldn’t be crazy to assume that the job might take longer. But that’s not the case. The Mini-Macaden used by KPOST was actually able to apply the roof system faster so the job is currently ahead of the roofing production schedule.

Doing more with less.

According to SOPREMA’s website, with traditional welding techniques, a crew can average between 5 to 9 rolls per hour. SOPREMA predicted that a four-member team using the Mini Macaden could be expected to install over 20 rolls per hour. KPost is getting more like 16-17 on this Facebook project in the side open areas. Still an amazing improvement.

“Completing our projects much faster allows KPOST to move our crews to the next job quicker, maximizing our revenue potential during the construction season,” says Little.

With a huge segment of the workforce nearing retirement and fewer younger workers entering the construction trades, technology can be the silver bullet. Companies like KPOST have realized this and it’s given them an advantage.

Will your company follow their lead or will you fall behind?

Categories
Cost & Pricing Definitions Leadership & Culture Most Popular Safety Best Practice

Your Ultimate Guide To Experience Modification Ratings (EMR)

After labor and materials, insurance is the third highest cost for a construction company.  That’s why it’s important to understand — and monitor — your experience modification rating (EMR).   EMR has a direct correlation to how much you pay in Workers’ Compensation Premiums. The lower your EMR, the less you pay in premiums.

But to be able to use your EMR to effectively control costs, you must first understand how it works.

What is an EMR?

In a nutshell, your EMR compares your workers’ compensation claims experience to other employers of similar size operating in the same type of business.

It’s the method for tailoring the cost of insurance to the characteristics of a specific business, but it also gives that business the opportunity to manage its own costs through measurable cost-saving programs.

How is EMR Calculated?

The actual process of calculating the EMR is sometimes complex, but the purpose of the formula is pretty straightforward. Here’s how it works: your company’s actual losses are compared to its expected losses by industry type. Factors taken into consideration are company size, unexpected large losses and the difference between loss frequency and loss severity.

EMR usually takes into account three years of claims history, excluding the most recent policy year. For example, the EMR for a policy period beginning January 1, 2018, includes claim costs for the policy periods beginning:

  • January 1, 2014
  • January 1, 2015
  • January 1, 2016

Who Gets Assigned an EMR?

Not every business is large enough to have an EMR.  Your workers’ compensation premium has to be above a certain dollar threshold specified by your state before your organization will be assigned an EMR. This minimum premium amount is usually around $3,000-$7,000.

What are EMR Classifications?

A workers compensation classification represents a group of employers that conduct similar types of businesses.  Classifications are usually represented by four-digit codes.   Examples of classifications are Roofing (5150) and Plumbing (5183).  All employers assigned to the same classification pay an identical rate (if they are located in the same state).

Classification systems are based on the idea that workers employed by similar businesses are prone to similar types of injuries. For example, employees who install roofs are subject to injuries caused by falls, burns, sun exposure, and lifting heavy objects. The types of injuries these workers sustain are relatively consistent from one roofer to another. Thus, all employers whose business consists of roofing installation are assigned to the same workers compensation classification.

Who Calculates Your EMR?

Your EMR is calculated by the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) or in some states, by an independent agency.

When the NCCI or a state bureau issues an experience modifier, the agency provides an experience rating worksheet. The worksheet shows how your modifier was calculated. It lists the relevant class codes and applicable payrolls, claim numbers and losses used in the calculations. Note that if you have incurred a large loss, only a portion of that loss is typically included in the calculation of your modifier. If you have incurred several small losses, all of those losses might be included in the calculation.

Pro Tip: Your modifier is generally more adversely affected if you have incurred numerous small losses rather than one large one.

How Does My EMR Affect my Premiums?

Your EMR represents either a credit or debit that’s applied to your workers’ compensation premium. An EMR of 1.0 is considered to be the industry average. While an EMR of more than 1.0 is a Debit Mod, which means your losses are worse than expected and a surcharge will be added to your premium. An EMR under 1.0 is a Credit Mod, which means losses are better than expected, resulting in a premium discount.

Here’s an example of how this works:

Premium

EMR

Modified Premium

$100,000

.75

$75,000

$100,000

1.00

$100,000

$100,000

1.25

$125,000

As you can see, an EMR of 1.25 would mean that insurance premiums could be as high as 25% more than a company with an EMR of 1.0.

How Can You Achieve & Maintain a Low EMR?

Of course, this is the question every business owner wants to know the answer to. So here is a list of things you can do to be more proactive when it comes to lowering your EMR:

  • Contact your insurance agent or review your policy documents to verify your current EMR is accurate. You might be paying more (or less) than you should due to incorrect or incomplete data.
  • Remember that EMR is influenced more by small, frequent losses than by large, infrequent ones. So the fewer losses you have, the better.
  • Create a strong, well-documented safety program that incorporates best practices such as toolbox talks, daily safety analysis, frequent site inspections, and safety training.
  • Use analytics to determine ways you can be proactive about injury prevention.
  • Also create or improve an effective return to work program to help lower your EMR.
  • Make sure that all injuries are reported promptly. Studies reveal that prompt injury reporting reduces the cost of claims.
  • Implement an active claims management program to manage outstanding reserves and focus on efficiently resolving open claims.
  • Train front-line supervisors and managers how to manage injured employees. Supervisors play a key role in managing the injury and recovery process. When there’s a good relationship between the injured employee and the supervisor, chances are you’ll get better results.
  • Practice due diligence during the hiring process. Hiring an employee who is not fit for the essential functions of the job will increase the risk of an injury. Of course, you’ll want to take the appropriate, and legal, steps in your “screening” process.

Harness Can Help Your Company Lower Your EMR & Save Money

If you want a stronger health and safety program with better documentation and more efficient workflows, Harness is your answer.

Categories
Safety Best Practice

Your Ultimate Guide To Toolbox Talks

Toolbox talks are short, informal meetings for field personnel to discuss hazards and safe work practices.  They are commonplace in the construction industry. Most often held weekly, they allow foremen and supervisors to keep safety top of mind amongst their workers.

Toolbox talks are also a key piece of safety due diligence and they are often provided as evidence when a company is defending themselves from OSHA. General Contractors often request subs submit these records to them as well.

If you’re like most companies doing toolbox talks, you’re probably doing them on paper. This can bring a number of issues into play such as;

  • Difficulty finding good meeting topics
  • Difficulty distributing content to remote workers
  • Lack of timeliness in workers returning completed talks
  • Poor quality of the records produced. Missing info, signatures, etc…
  • Harder to locate historical records when you need them most

And let’s not forget how much construction workers hate to do paperwork. This can lead to a lack of participation in your safety process and ultimately to more risk.

Harness makes conducting & documenting toolbox talks fun and easy:

  • Hundreds of topics in both English & Spanish that can be sent directly to your team each week
  • Capture all the important information about attendees including signatures right from a smartphone.
  • Instant visibility of safety program participation via our customized dashboards.
  • Easily access historical records by project, crew, topic, or person.
  • Share professional looking PDF copies with your GC or customers with a few clicks.

Harness developed our toolbox talk feature in collaboration with contractors. We’ve found a way of mimicking what was typically done on paper while removing the inefficiencies and strengthening the records produced. With Harness, your team will be completing their toolbox talks quickly and easily. You’ll know that this essential piece of safety due diligence is getting done and getting right.

To find out more about how Harness makes toolbox talks better, book a demo today.